Dispatches

Ronco Showtime rotisserie cooking times

Man peering through window of Ronco Showtime rotisserie as meat cooks.
I’m happy to help you out with these Ronco Showtime rotisserie cooking times, but please try not to stare directly into the meat. (Photo © Dave 77459 via Flickr/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

If you have a Ronco Showtime rotisserie but never can remember cook times or what you did with the manual, you’re in the right place.

A nice thing about having your own website is you can do whatever you want with it, so way back in 2014 I decided to post this comprehensive list of Ronco Showtime rotisserie cook times primarily just so I’d be able to find them myself whenever I needed them. Interestingly, this has ended up becoming one of the most popular posts I’ve ever done (which is kind of amusing since I primarily did it just because I was tired of trying to keep up with my own Ronco Showtime rotisserie instruction manual).

Unfortunately, my Ronco Showtime rotisserie has long since gone to that great small-appliance scrap heap in the sky; it still worked fine — except for the timer knob, which broke just after the one-year warranty ran out — but I ended up moving to a smaller space and just didn’t have enough kitchen counter space for it anymore.

I miss having one, though, and I’m glad this list of cooking times can continue helping other people until I end up getting a new Ronco Showtime rotisserie for myself someday. The roast beef alone changed my life.

About these Ronco Showtime Rotisserie cooking times

These cooking times were pulled from the manual for the Ronco Showtime 5000T Platinum rotisserie, but should hold true for most of the Showtime line of rotisseries. Just remember all cook times are approximate and you should add two minutes to the times listed here in order to allow time for the rotisserie to come up to temperature.

Always base doneness on USDA-recommended internal temperatures rather than arbitrary cooking times. The Ronco Showtime rotisserie cook times listed here are merely a guide; if you use this chart to cook meat that kills you, it’s not my fault. (And don’t bother trying to sue me — I’m a journalist, I have nothing.)

All temperatures below are listed in degrees Fahrenheit. Because this is America.

POULTRY COOK TIMES

  • Whole chicken or duck (4.5 lbs.): 15 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 180.
  • Cornish game hens (2-4 lbs., side-by-side): 10 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 180.
  • Two chickens or ducks (4 lbs. each, side-by-side): 10 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 180.
  • Whole turkey or turkey breast (up to 15 lbs.): 12 to 15 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 180.
  • Chicken pieces (3 lbs., in basket): 45 minutes total to reach an internal temperature of 180.
  • Turkey burgers (1.25 lbs., in basket): 30 to 35 minutes total to reach an internal temperature of 165.
  • Chicken kebabs (8 kebabs): 30 to 35 minutes total to reach an internal temperature of 180.

PORK COOK TIMES

  • Baby back ribs (1 to 3 racks, parboiled for 15 minutes): 35 minutes total to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium or 170 for well-done.
  • Rolled pork loin (5.5 lbs.):  20 to 30 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium or 170 for well-done.
  • Pork tenderloin (1.75 to 2 lbs.): 30 to 35 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium or 170 for well-done.
  • Pork chops (4 to 6 chops, in basket): 20 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium or 170 for well-done.
  • Boneless pork chops (6 chops, in basket): 20 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium or 170 for well-done.
  • Cooked boneless ham (3 lbs.): 13 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium.
  • Uncooked Italian sausages (up to 16, in basket): 30 to 35 minutes per pound to reach a minimum internal temperature of 16o.
  • Cooked Italian sausages (up to 16, in basket): 20 to 25 minutes per pound to reach a minimum internal temperature of 160.
  • Hot dogs (up to 16, in basket): 10 to 15 minutes per pound. A minimum internal temperature of 160 is typically recommended, but lots of people eat raw hot dogs and don’t die. (I’m one of them.)

BEEF COOK TIMES

  • Standing rib roast (up to 6.5 lbs.): 18 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 145 for medium.
  • Other beef roasts (up to 6.5 lbs.): 16 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 140 for rare, 18 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium or 20 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 170 for well-done.
  • Steaks (1.25″ thick, in basket): 20 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium.
  • Hamburgers (up to 9, 0.25 lbs. each, in basket): 20 minutes per pound to reach a minimum internal temperature of 160.
  • Beef kebabs (8 kebabs): 20 minutes per pound to reach a minimum internal temperature of 160.

LAMB COOK TIMES

  • Leg of lamb (up to 6.5 lbs.): 22 minutes per pound to reach an internal temperature of 160 for medium.

SEAFOOD COOK TIMES

  • Salmon steaks (4-6 steaks, 1.25″ thick, in basket): 20 to 25 minutes total.
  • Fish fillets (0.75″ thick, in basket): 25 minutes total.
  • Fish fillets (thin, in basket): 18 minutes total.
  • Shrimp kebabs (8 kebabs): 20 to 25 minutes total.
  • Halibut fillets (0.75″ thick, breaded, in basket): 30 minutes total.

Now, go break out your Ronco Showtime rotisserie and char some meat. If you need a new one (like I do) and you have the counter space (which I don’t), you can support this website by checking out the current Ronco Showtime rotisserie models on Amazon (affiliate link).

(R.I.P. Ron Popeil. Still not sure about that Pocket Fisherman, but I really enjoyed your Showtime rotisserie when I still had one.)

Billy Suratt

Billy Suratt is a Mid-South photojournalist and Kentucky writer. He enjoys long walks on beaches, short walks through parking lots and shooting football by candlelight. Follow him on Twitter, but please not through any parking lots.

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